Tag: wells

Sinnar farmers breathe life back into irrigated farming

Falling agricultural income, accumulated power bills, spiraling farm loans, acute dependence on water tankers and the resultant migration to cities in search of livelihood are now referred to in the past tense in the 19 villages of Sinnar taluka in Maharashtra’s Nashik district, thanks to the unique participatory action of water management involving local farmers, an NGO, corporate donors and the state’s irrigation authorities.

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Farmers’ plight: Leaving land for a lesser life

Scanty rainfall, depleting groundwater levels, barren farmlands and mass migration of farmers to cities for better livelihood – this is the reality of most of rural India today. Many parts of India are witnessing this growing trend of farmers leaving their lands in search of jobs in cities. Andhra Pradesh is no different with several districts of the state seeing a rising rate in outmigration of farmers. Around 4.87 lakh people are reported to have left Anantapur district as per last April’s count by the Alliance for Sustainable and Holistic Agriculture (ASHA), a pan-India confederation of farmers’ organisations. That’s more than 10 percent of the district’s population!

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Why your tourist toilet habits are bad for locals – and the environment

Research suggests that in some locations up to 40% of water is consumed by tourists. Tourists tend to splash out far more per day on average than local residents, who are often outcompeted by industry for water access. Using limited freshwater supplies to flush tourists’ toilets means less for residents’ drinking, cleaning and cooking needs.

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Climate change amplifies superbugs’ resistance to antibiotics

Bacteria that have become resistant to one or all known antibiotics called superbugs, could multiply more rapidly in India because of climate change, low access to sanitation and toilets, lack of wastewater treatment, no regulations for antibiotic release in pharmaceutical wastewaters and indiscriminate use of antibiotics among the public. India is among the countries with the highest bacterial disease burden in the world, and thus the consequences of ABR could be devastating.

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Cooking imposes heavy burden on rural women

She wakes up at 5am when it is still dark and the rest of the family is asleep. She walks 4 km to reach a hillock and starts gathering firewood. By daybreak, she is back and starts cooking for the family. What about water for cooking? That involves another trek.

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Is it worth the salt?

The fields are silvery white with raw salt crusts in the vicinity of Nawa, a small town on the northwestern banks of Sambhar lake, India’s largest inland lake. Nawa lies about 90 kilometres east of Jaipur. Also an extensive saline wetland and a Ramsar site, the blinding white salt flats stretch as far as one can see. The place is a key wintering area for thousands of pink flamingos and other migratory birds from northern Asia and Siberia.

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Citizens could save India’s environment, if a 15-year-old law is used well

As time progressed, Baiga Chak–the officially recognised traditional habitat of the Baiga tribe known for its myriad species and their inclusion in the local diet, lifestyle and healthcare–started losing its biodiversity. A nonprofit, the National Institute of Women, Child, and Youth Development (NIWCYD), established “forest study groups” in various villages in 2005. The approach was unique: Instead of getting experts to research on the changing ecosystem, villagers were trained not only to analyse the situation but also to suggest conservation plans.

In short, they were to become citizen scientists.

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Children do not smile in Dhanbad villages

Sixty-eight-year-old Himanshu Chakrabarty of Brahman Tola village in Ghadbad panchayat of Dhanbad has only one desire — death. For more than 15 years, he is suffering from weak and deformed bones with almost no flesh on his body, limping around like a living skeleton. Patient of a crippling disease called fluorosis, which caused due to an excess intake of fluoride, Chakrabarty wants an end to his suffering. “I only want death,” he cries out in pain. “How much more do I have to suffer?”

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Dammed or Damned: Why Are Dams Undesirable In The 21st Century?

Rivers in different parts of the world have been dammed to fulfill human needs like water for irrigation, industries and domestic supplies, to control floods, and to produce electricity. These have often been celebrated as human victory over nature, glorified as engineering marvels and claimed variously as highest, longest, etc as a matter of national pride. But rarely has there been a holistic assessment, or appreciation of what a dam does to the natural entity called a river and its adverse impacts on all the associated life forms, including humans.

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Saving Kunds Of Vrindavan

An NGO comes forward to restore the forgotten kunds of Vrindavan which are not just historical marvels but are also freshwater sources.

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